Top Ten New Authors for 2012

This week's top ten list is one I like:  Top Ten Favorite New-To-Me Authors I Read In 2012.  I've found lots of authors this year, so I'm very happy to share them.

10. Marva Collins.  Collins goes on my classical education shelf as a great inspiration.  She is highly regarded in classical ed circles, and I finally got to read one of her books.

9. Sharon M. Draper.  Probably the best new-to-me children's book I read all year.

8. Tsitsi Dangarembga.  I thought Nervous Conditions was wonderful and plan to read The Book of Not at some point.

7.  Jorge Luis Borges. Great stories; I'm glad I finally picked him up.

6. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.  My first new author of the year!  Eva recommended her highly, so thank you Eva!

5. Jacques Lusseyran.  His memoir, And There Was Light, was one of my favorite books of the year.  Read it!

4. Katherine Boo. I was so impressed with her writing, especially with her ability to take herself out of it.  Her wonderful chronicle of a slum neighborhood in a modern Indian city was not only amazing and insightful, it didn't feature her as a central figure.  

3. Gustave Flaubert.  His writing in Madame Bovary was just perfect.

2. Christine de Pizan.  The Book of the City of Ladies is now my favorite medieval text.

1. Boris Pasternak.  I just loved it.  Doctor Zhivago is such a great book.  The writing, Russia, all of it.



Comments

  1. New follower! I'm not familiar with any of these authors. I guess I need to look into them.

    Check out my TTT.

    Sandy @ Somewhere Only We Know

    ReplyDelete
  2. Flaubert! Nice! This is the first list I've seen him on. I've always wanted to read Doctor Zhivago but haven't! I love Russian lit, so I'm not sure what my hang up as been!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for stopping by, Sandy! :)

    Christine, you must read Doctor Zhivago. It's not even difficult, and you'll love it.

    ReplyDelete

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